The Gleneagles Story, Parts 1 and 2

In August 1935, British officials Ivor McClure and Maurice Banks carried out aerial surveys in Newfoundland for a seaplane base and land aerodrome for a proposed transatlantic air service, with the opening…

Let There Be Light: The Opening of Gander’s Power House

The clearing of land at Hattie’s Camp railway siding, future site of the Newfoundland Airport, began during the summer of 1936. By year’s end, buildings at the rapidly developing aerodrome included…

Who Was Gander’s First Postwar Airport Manager?

With the end of the Second World War, commercial airlines began scheduled transatlantic operations through Gander. The airfield had been under RCAF control since 1941, but at midnight on 31 March 1946…

Gander’s First Fire Truck

A tweet on the Gander Airport Historical Society website in March 2018 showed a photo of Gander airport’s first fire engine and posed the question of its fate. Documents at the Rooms provincial…

On the Precipice of Change: Gander in May 1940

When war broke out in September 1939, the Newfoundland Airport (soon renamed Gander) was defenceless but operational with a rudimentary airport infrastructure. The airport was still undefended…

Gander’s WWII U.S. Commanding Officers

In May 1941, Major (later General) Jarred V. Crabb of the 21st Reconnaissance Squadron became the first commanding officer of the U.S. Army Air Base at Gander. Born in 1902 in Olney, Illinois…

Gander’s Postwar Transition

In April 1941, the Newfoundland Commission of Government relinquished control of Gander airfield to the RCAF, agreeing to lease to the Canadian Government the lands occupied by…

Gander’s First Crash: Hudson T9446

On 10/11 November 1940, Captain D.C.T. Bennett led the first of four experimental formation flights of Hudson bombers from Gander to the United Kingdom – the genesis of what would…

A Case of Suspected Sabotage at Gander

On the afternoon of 4 November 1944, Ferry Command B-25 Mitchell KJ680 arrived at Gander from Dorval, captained by Pilot Officer Acheson. By day’s end, Gander would dispatch eleven…

The ‘Spirit of Lockheed-Vega Employees’: A Counterargument

First off, I applaud Mr. Beaudoin for his tireless work on RAF Ferry Command. However, after reading the recent GAHS posting “Lockheed-Vega Hudson Mystery,” I felt that a brief counterargument…

A Helping Hand From the RAF Welfare Fund

During the Second World War, the RAF Ferry Command detachment at Gander established the RAF Welfare Fund, with contributions coming from civilian employees. Administered by a local…

A Ferry Command Christmas Rescue

On 21 December 1944, Ferry Command Hudson EW896 departed Gander on a routine transportation flight to Dorval (Montréal) with twenty-one-year-old Flight Lieutenant John W.H. Narburgh…

Squadron Leader N.E. ‘Molly’ Small

During the Second World War, Gander became home to several Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons tasked with carrying out antisubmarine patrols and convoy escort work over the stormy…

From Gander to Normandy: F/O Adrian Ralph Taylor

On 6 June 1944, the allied nations of Canada, Great Britain, and the United States launched Operation Overlord, the invasion of northwest Europe. Among the tens of thousands of D-Day…
These postings can also be viewed at Robert Pelley’s Gander History Website 
and the Gander Airport Historical Society Website

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